10 Days of Character Building: Defining Characters By Their Roles

This is Day 1 of 10 Days of Character Building One of your first considerations when creating a character should be the role you intend them to play in your story. Is the character a hero or a villain. If the character is a hero, is she a straightforward hero, a dark hero or a comic hero? Below is a short list of character types that borrows heavily from Christopher Vogler’s book, The Writers Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers. His book goes much more deeply into the different aspects of these characters. I highly recommend it. One thing to keep … Continue reading 10 Days of Character Building: Defining Characters By Their Roles

Get Ready for 10 Days of Character Building

The audience has spoken. Our next group project will be 10 Days of Character Building. The project will officially start on October 20th and run through October 30th. This means that it will be completed in time for anyone who wants to join in the fun and excitement of National Novel Writing Month to have their characters ready. The 10 Days of Character Building project will consist of daily articles about different ways to develop characters for stories. The general way to participate will to be to craft a different character with each method and post your results. If you … Continue reading Get Ready for 10 Days of Character Building

Short Stuff: Business 2.0, OneNote, New Projects and Mom

I just received my final issue of Business 2.0 magazine this week. Business 2.0 was a pretty good magazine that concentrated on new business ideas, startup companies and internet-based companies. It was part of the TimeWarner publishing juggernaut, which was probably both a blessing and a curse. While TW has a lot of money and clout, they are very focused on the bottom line, and that means a magazine either has to succeed wildly or it is viewed as a failure. Those are difficult standards to live up to. The truly disappointing outcome of this is that Business 2.0 isn’t … Continue reading Short Stuff: Business 2.0, OneNote, New Projects and Mom

Weekly Poetry Assignment 1: Compilations and Love Poems

As we discussed at the end of 30 Poems in 30 Days, I would like to continue in the spirit of the project by posting a weekly poetry assignment along with at least a few words about a poetry-related topic. The form of these posts is going to be similar, but not identical to the 30 Poems in 30 Days posts. I will still discuss poetry every week, but the topic will probably be more free form and a little less instructory. I just made that word up, do you like it? I thought about instrutorlicious, but that word had … Continue reading Weekly Poetry Assignment 1: Compilations and Love Poems

Poetry Publishing on the Cheap: Chapbooks

What is a chapbook? A chapbook is a book that created by folding standard 8 1/2 x 11 (The size varies outside of the United States) paper in half so that you create a shape close to that of a common paperback book. By doing this, a single sheet of paper yields four pages of a book. You then bind the multiple pages together by stapling along the crease of the sheets of paper. A mere eight sheets of paper can create a 32 page chapbook. Because of the limitations of the stapling and folding process, chapbooks tend to run … Continue reading Poetry Publishing on the Cheap: Chapbooks

How to Freelance for a Private Detective or a Mental Patient

Successful freelance writers have a sense of humor – they have to. As a freelance writer, you are going to find yourself in a number of absurd situations. The people who hire freelance writers are often a little odd. Some of them are downright strange and the things they ask you to do can be just as strange. I once had a private detective as a client. He lived up to just about every detective cliché you can think of. He paid in cash no matter what the amount. He insisted we meet in public places. He drove an old … Continue reading How to Freelance for a Private Detective or a Mental Patient

30 Poems in 30 Days Index

Below is an index to our 30 Poems in 30 Days Project. 30 Poems in 30 Days: Why you should write poetry 30 Poems in 30 Days: Writing About Yourself 30 Poems in 30 Days: Writing About Issues 30 Poems in 30 Days: Poetry of Place 30 Poems in 30 Days: Persona Poems 30 Poems in 30 Days: Developing Your Voice 30 Poems in 30 Days: About Forms and Lists 30 Poems in 30 Days: Elegies and Memories 30 Poems in 30 Days: A Brief Glossary of Meter 30 Poems in 30 Days: The Good the Bad and the Meter … Continue reading 30 Poems in 30 Days Index

Don’t include any word with a single “A” in it, but do include at least one word with two “A”s in it

This is Day 30! of 30 Poems in 30 Days All Good Things Time flies like an arrow. Fruit flies like a banana. Groucho Marx We’ve reached the final day of our little poetry project. It has been quite a journey, at least for me, and I really appreciate those of you who took the time to post your poetry. I wasn’t sure, when I started this, whether or not I would get any participants and I was happy that a few of you chose to come along. It would have been a much harder journey without your poems and … Continue reading Don’t include any word with a single “A” in it, but do include at least one word with two “A”s in it

Write the final line of your poem first, then figure out a way to get there

This is Day 29 of 30 Poems in 30 Days Six Quick Tips We are almost to the end of our 30 day journey through the world of poetry. I still have several poems left to write and I am determined to do it, so I am not going to delve too deep tonight. Instead I am going to leave you with six quick tips to take forward with you. Nobody said writing poetry was easy. If they did, they probably weren’t very good at it. Accept the challenge. Embrace the challenge. Set aside time at least once a week … Continue reading Write the final line of your poem first, then figure out a way to get there

Write a poem that either uses no words longer than five letters or no words shorter than five letters

This is Day 28 of 30 Poems in 30 Days Choose Your Words Wisely Some poets write what they feel and spend very little time thinking about which word to use. They rely on instinct. Other poets spend a considerable amount of time trying to choose exactly the right words. They analyze and consider every word. I’m not going to advocate one method over the other. In my opinion, it is up to the poet to determine their approach to word choice. I am certainly in the middle of the road with my approach. I care about word choice, and … Continue reading Write a poem that either uses no words longer than five letters or no words shorter than five letters